National Restaurant Trends
A dish made from locally grown produce means its ingredients have had less of a travel time from their place of cultivation to the dinner plate, which means a diners will enjoy a fresh and more flavorful meal. The use of organic produce means that restaurant goers can enjoy their favorite foods without the health risk of consuming ingredients filled with growth hormones, pesticides and chemical preservatives. Planners should feel free to ask dining facilities whether or not the products they use meet these requirements.

Extravagant deserts are on the decline and quickly being replaced by mini-desserts that offer the same rich, sweet taste at a fraction of the caloric intake. These desert “shots” are becoming increasingly popular, as most restaurants who have adopted the trend have made their entire desert menu available in these pint-sized servings.

The NRA’s survey also reveals that in terms of food preparation, frying is out the door when it comes to mainstream dining. Instead, smoking, sous-vide, sautéing and grilling are now the preparation methods of choice, with braising being the most popular as reported by the nationwide pool of chefs.

Economical Adjustments

Despite the current economic condition, Americans still eat out on a fairly regular basis, but what restaurants are offering is changing, especially when it comes to corporate groups.

For one, restaurant owners are willing to go the extra mile to please the customer, including event planners that can bring in a large crowd. Shareable items are popping up on menus that had previously shunned the concept and many top-tier restaurants are beginning to do away with their elaborate price-fixed dinners, opening up the way for more practical a la carte dining.

   
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